Bode Group

Group leader

Title

Name

First Name

Position

PD Dr. med.

Bode

Johannes

Senior physican of the Department for Gastroenterology, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf

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Researchers

Title

Name

First Name

Position

Karthe

Juliane

Post Doc

Dr. rer. nat.

Ehlting

Christian

Post Doc

Dr. rer. nat.

Albrecht

Ute

Post Doc


BioStruct Fellow

Title

Name

First Name

Position

St.-Ex. Pham.

Eisenbürger

Sabine

PhD student

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Further Team Members

Technicians:

2

PHD/MD students:

6


Contact

Bode
Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectiology
University Hospital of the Heinrich-Heine University
Moorenstrasse 5
40225 Düsseldorf
Germany

Tel: +49 211 81-18952
Fax: +49 211 81-17517


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Special Methodical Expertise

  • Investigation of cellular signal-transduction using for example siRNA based techniques
  • Methods to analyse transcriptional gene regulation such as Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)
  • Analysis of protein/protein interaction using methods such as a pull down assays
  • Imaging techniques based on confocal laser scanning microscopy or life cell imaging

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Main areas of research interest

  • Control of macrophage activity during inflammation through the cross-talk of cytokine-/pathogen-induced intracellular signal-transduction cascades
  • Influence of pathogen derived factors such as viral proteins or bacterial wall components on host cell signaling and assessment of the functional consequences A) for the host cell and B) for the pathogen
  • Analysis of the hepatic acute phase response on systems biology level

Facilities

The laboratories cover the following gene technology security levels:

S1

The laboratories cover the following biohazard levels:

BSL2

Other security laboratories or special facilities:

  • radioactive laboratory

Laboratory Equipment

General equipment available in the laboratories:

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell culture
  • Molecular biology
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology
  • Microbiology
  • Biocomputing
  • Histology
  • Imaging


Special equipment, which is not generally available in most laboratories:

  • Confocal laser scanning microscope LSM510 meta
  • Facilities for life cell imaging
  • Toponomics (laser scanning microscope for fully automated image acquisition)
  • FACS
  • Gene Array platform


Non-standard methods, which are established in the laboratory:

  • ChIP: chromatin immune precipitation for analysis of transcription factor / polymerase binding to respective promoter elements/or to the respective transcriptional starting site
  • EMSA: electrophoretic mobility shift assay for analysis of DNA binding of transcription factors
  • Pull down analysis of protein/protein interaction
  • Cellular expression of siRNA resistant mutated proteins which allows the suppression of the endogenous protein being replaced by the siRNA resistant mutant
  • As outlined above confocal laser scanning microscopy and life cell imaging

Important references

  • Brenndörfer, E. D., Karthe, J., Frelin, L., Cebula, P., Erhardt, A., Schulte am Esch, J., Hengel, H., Bartenschlager, R., Sällberg, M., Häussinger, D. & Bode, J.G. (2009). The hepatitis C virus non-structural 3/4A protease activates EGF-induced signal-transduction by cleavage of the T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase. Hepatology in press
  • Albrecht, U., Yang, X.P. Asselta, Keitel, V., Tenchini, M.L., Ludwig, S., Heinrich, P.C., Häussinger, D., Schaper, F., & Bode, J.G. (2007). Activation of NF-kappaB by IL-1beta blocks IL-6-induced sustained STAT3 activation and STAT3-dependent gene expression of the human gamma-fibrinogen gene. Cell Signal 19, 1866-1878
  • Ehlting, C., Lai, W.S., Schaper, F., Brenndörfer, E.D., Matthes, R.J., Heinrich, P.C ., Ludwig, S., Blackshear, P.J., Gaestel, M., Häussinger, D., & Bode, J.G. (2007). Regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) mRNA stability by TNF-alpha involves activation of the MKK6/p38MAPK/MK2 cascade. J Immunol 178,2813-2826.
  • Bode, J. G., Schweigart, J. ,Kehrmann, J., Ehlting, C., Schaper, F., Heinrich, P.C. & Häussinger, D. (2003). TNF-alpha induces tyrosine phosphorylation and recruitment of the Src homology protein-tyrosine phosphatase 2 to the gp130 signal-transducing subunit of the IL-6 receptor complex. J Immunol 171,257-266.
  • Bode, J. G., Nimmesgern, A., Schmitz, J., Schaper, F., Schmitt, M., Frisch, W., Häussinger, D., Heinrich, P.C. & Graeve, L. (1999). LPS and TNFalpha induce SOCS3 mRNA and inhibit IL-6-induced activation of STAT3 in macrophages. FEBS Lett 463,365-370

Cooperators

  • Ludwig, Stephan, Professor Dr., Institute for Molecular Virology, University of Münster
  • Gaestel, Matthias, Professor Dr., Institute for Biochemistry, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover
  • Sällberg, Matti, Professor Dr., Division of Clinical Virology, F 68, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, S-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden
  • Klingmüller, Ursula, Priv.-Doz. Dr., Devision Systems Biology of Signaltransduction, DKFZ Heidelberg
  • Timmer, Jens, Professor Dr., Center for Data analysis and Model generation, Physiks Department, University Freiburg
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